Dupuytrens Contraction (Contracture)

Dupuytren’s contraction or contracture is a disease characterized by the deformity of the hand that develops over decades. A Dupuytren’s Contraction or Contracture affects the underlying connective tissue of the palm’s skin. It happens when tissues form knots beneath the outer layers of the skin, and over time, this would cause the formation of a thick cord responsible for pulling one or more fingers into a bent position.

Dupuytren’s contraction or contracture normally progresses slowly over several years. Sometimes it can develop over weeks or months. However, several people also experience a steady progression, while in others, it may start then stop.

Dupuytren’s contracture usually begins as a thickening and stiffening of the skin on the palm. As Dupuytren’s contracture progresses, the skin on the palm may look wrinkled or dented. A firm lump may form on the palm. This lump may be sensitive to touch but classically is not painful. In the later stages of Dupuytren’s contraction or contracture, cords of tissue form under the skin on your palm and may extend up to your fingers. As the cords constrict, the fingers may be pulled toward the palm and sometimes severely.

The ring finger and pinkie are commonly affected, though the middle finger may also be involved. The thumb and the pointer finger are rarely affected by this. Dupuytren’s contraction or contracture can occur in both hands, though one hand is frequently affected more severely than the other.

Causes of Dupuytrens Contraction or Contracture

Doctors don’t know what causes Dupuytren’s contraction or contracture. Some specialists have speculated that it may be connected with an autoimmune reaction, where an individual’s immune system attacks its own body tissues. Dupuytren’s contraction or contracture often go together with conditions that cause contractures in other parts of the body, such as the feet, which is the Ledderhose disease, and the penis which is Peyronie’s disease.

Risk factors of Dupuytrens Contraction or Contracture:

The following are the factors that cause a higher probability of an incidence in Dupuytrens contracture.

First of all, there is age. This commonly afflicts those of ages 50 and over. Then there is gender. Men are more susceptible to develop Dupuytren’s, and contractures in men are bound to be more severe than in women. Also, there is a particular ancestry that it commonly afflicts. The Northern European descent is at a higher risk of this disease as compared to any other race. Dupuytren’s is genetic, and a high probability of occurrence is existent, especially when Dupuytrens Contraction or Contracture is a heredo-familial disease. Smoking and alcoholism also increase the risk. Lastly, many people diagnosed with Diabetes have also reported increased susceptibility to Dupuytrens Contraction or contracture.

Complications of Dupuytrens Contraction or Contracture

Dupuytren’s Contraction or contracture can make the performance of certain tasks using your hand impossible. Many people, at first, do not experience much disability or inconvenience with predominantly hand-using activities such as writing. But as Dupuytren’s contracture advances, it can decrease one’s capacity to fully open the hand and make it challenging to grasp certain objects or get the hand into narrow spaces.

Preparing for an appointment for the patient with Dupuytrens Contraction or Contracture Usually, you may first ask for a referral from your family doctor to a specialist for this kind of affliction. Once you are ready to have that medical appointment, write the answers to the questions below to help the specialist diagnose and determine the appropriate treatment for your condition.

When did the symptoms arise? Have they been getting bigger or worse? Does something improve or worsen it? How does the contracture impede your activities of daily living?

During the physical exam, the doctor will have a visual inspection of the hands, relate them to each other, and inspect for any crumpling or puckering on the palms. The doctor will also palpate the different hands and fingers’ different regions to check for hardened lumps, knots, or bands of tissue.

Tests and diagnosis

The only diagnostic procedure employed to check Dupuytrens Contraction or contracture is composed of a simple maneuver, called the tabletop test, which can determine if a person has contracture in the hand. If a patient can lay their hand, palm down, and flat on a tabletop, the patient is then free from a contracture. Mostly though, doctors can diagnose Dupuytren’s contracture by simply visual inspection and palpation of hands.

Treatments and drugs

If the disease advances sluggishly, causes no pain, and especially if it has little to no impact on the ability to use hands for everyday tasks, you may not need any drastic treatment. With this, you may choose to wait and check if the Dupuytrens Contraction or contracture progresses, or you may have radiation therapy which is the most advisable for the early stages of this disease.

Treatment includes eliminating or breaking apart the cords that are pulling the fingers in the direction of your palm. This can be done in several different ways. The choice of technique depends on the severity of the symptoms and any other health complications a patient may have.

Needling is a method that uses a needle that is inserted through the skin to puncture and break the hardened cord of tissue that’s contracting a finger or fingers. Contractures can recur; however, the procedure can be repeated if necessary. Some specialists now use ultrasound to guide the needle. This advancement can really reduce the risk of unintentional injury to the surrounding nerves or tendons of the contracture site. The greatest advantage of the needling technique is that there is no incision, and it can be done on multiple fingers at just one time. Afterward, usually, very minimal physical therapy is needed. The disadvantage of this procedure is that it cannot be employed in some locations due to the risk of damaging a nerve.

The Food and Drug Administration also approves enzyme injections as a treatment for Dupuytren’s Contraction or contracture. The injections contain an enzyme, collagenase clostridium histolyticum (Xiaflex), which is geared for treating Dupuytren’s contracture. The enzyme in this medication relaxes and deteriorates the rigid cord in the palm of an afflicted hand. A day after the administered injection, the doctor will manipulate the hand to break off the cord and straighten the fingers. In many ways, this is similar to the needling technique except that the manipulation of the hand happens the following day instead of the same day for the injection procedure. They have the same advantages and disadvantages as the Needling technique.

Another option is to surgically get rid of the tissue in the palm which is affected by the disease. This may be in the early stages of the disease as the tissues cannot easily be identified. It may not be a preferred method for patients due to it being invasive, but it can prove very effective for patient recovery.

The Three Pillars of Posture Motivation | Posture Doctor

The way we hold ourselves is a reflection of how we feel about ourselves. Not only do we look more attractive with upright posture, but science is beginning to show us that our brains are more capable of positivity when the body is in an upright stance.

What motivates you?

Are you driven by reward or punishment – carrot or stick?

The Carrot and Stick theory of motivation was given to us by philosopher Jeremy Bentham, and is derived from the old story of a donkey. The story goes that the best way to move a donkey is to put a carrot out in front and jab it with a stick from behind. It’s not really a very nice story. The carrot is the reward for action (moving forward for our stubborn donkey) while the stick is the punishment for inaction or not moving.

I’m definitely a carrot kinda gal. I spent last weekend training for my CSIA Level 1 certification. The CSIA or Canadian Ski Instructor’s Alliance, enables me to teach downhill skiing (which I delight in) to beginners and intermediates.

The stick was clear – the grueling impact on my body skiing hard for 16 hours over three days. On average, I was 25-30 years older than the majority of students on the course. Although it feels good to look back and think wow that was torture and I did it, that wasn’t my main motivation.

I would never run a marathon, or participate in a Tough Mudder competition. That just doesn’t do it for me. I’m a carrot kinda gal as I said. I don’t get up each morning to Posturecise, to avoid a stiff body, although I love that benefit; I Posturecise daily because I like what I see when I look in the mirror. Carrot, carrot, carrot!

Further Resources: Posturecise Crash Course

Does that sound awful? It’s not that I’m entirely vain – although I am a Leo! It’s that looking (and feeling) youthful signifies to me, that I get to do what I want to do, well into my senior years. I want to ski when I’m 70 and hike the Pyrenees Mountains when I’m 80. Nature is everything to me. That is my motivation. I love a good carrot!

Why do we want to correct our posture?


Over the years, many of you have become committed posture students. You enroll and actively participate in courses at Posture School, you email to ask questions about your posture and health and some of you work 1-2-1 with me over many months. Underlying each of these decisions was some kind of motivation.

Three pillars of posture motivation


It occurred to me fairly recently that the factors driving our motivation to correct our posture, can be summarized into three main categories or pillars of motivation.

Three Pillars of Posture Motivation

Pain


Pain is a wonderful motivator. It creates immediate need for action. At some point in our lives, most of us have been motivated by this stick. The problem for most of us who use this to drive our ongoing motivation, is that when the pain is gone, so is our motivation to take action.

Lack of pain does not equate lack of problem.

We can learn to thank our pain, because pain is a part of life and getting rid of the pain shouldn’t be the main goal. If we place our hand near a hot stove, pain very quickly makes us move our hand away. Without pain, we’d leave our hand in the hot flame and get badly burned.

I like to think of pain, as one of the body’s great communication tools. We can learn not to be fearful of pain but instead, become fascinated by our wonderfully working bodies. What is that headache telling us – are we dehydrated, are our muscles tense, do we need to eat?

Appearance


You’d be surprised how often I hear from you about posture and appearance.

  • I have been struggling with neck hump since my early 20s.
  • How do I stand up straight without flaring my rib cage?
  • I sort of slump forward and this does not look good.
  • When I pose for photos, my upper body always leans far backward.
  • I thought I was standing straight but in reality my upper body always leaned far backward.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to look attractive. In fact there has been a lot of research into body posture and attractiveness.  The science suggests that our posture not only reflects our feelings, but also influences them.

One particular factor of attractiveness that has been extensively researched (including this study) is that of symmetry. You can think of symmetry as good posture and asymmetry as bad posture.

Symmetry (good posture)
Asymmetry (bad posture)

Deviations from bilateral symmetry may be linked to various stressors in pre-natal development … The extent of these deviations may reflect the inability of an individual to cope with environmental and genetic stressors. Fluctuating asymmetry is related with various genetic diseases and chromosomal abnormalities, such as scoliosis … Superior symmetry (ideal posture), therefore, signals the quality of genes that are more resistant to biological and environmental stressors such as disease, pathogens, and parasitic infection.

Wow! Now, you understand why attractiveness is such a huge motivation for so many of us.

Confidence


The way we hold ourselves is a reflection of how we feel about ourselves. Not only do we look more attractive with upright posture, but science is beginning to show us that our brains are more capable of positivity when the body is in an upright stance.

I have always been struggling with my curved shoulders and this is because of my low self esteem and lack of confidence I suffered as a teenager.

In one study researchers found that people who were told to sit up straight were more likely to believe the thoughts they wrote down while in that posture, about whether or not they were qualified for a job.

Richard Petty (co-author of the study) said that: “Most of us were taught that sitting up straight gives a good impression to other people. But it turns out that our posture can also affect the way we think about ourselves.”

The end result of this study was that when students wrote positive thoughts about themselves, they rated themselves more highly when sitting in an upright posture because the upright posture led to confidence in their positive thoughts.

However, when students wrote negative thoughts about themselves, they rated themselves more negatively when in the upright position (vs. slouched position) because the upright posture led to more confidence in their thoughts, even though they were negative.

That suggests our thoughts are influenced by our posture, even though we don’t realize that is what’s happening. In other words good posture leads to less self doubt. Very cool!

From my experience, a desire to correct our posture stems from one of three motivations, that I call the Three Pillars of Posture Motivation:

  1. Pain
  2. Attractiveness
  3. Confidence

Motivation isn’t black and white, it’s black, white and shades of grey. There is of course great overlap, but it is highly likely that you are primarily motivated by one of these three pillars.

So, are you driven by carrot or stick? I’d love to read your comments on this one. Pop your thoughts below.

Why Women Have an Increased Rate of Low Back Pain | Posture Doctor

What was most interesting was that for men low back pain was associated with older age, low education (I’m guessing this suggests the likelihood of more physically demanding jobs), high blood pressure and smoking; but for women if was occupational and ergonomic factors.

Recently I came across this study about the factors that affect low back pain in men and women. This was a fairly large study of 600 participants. They looked at the prevalence of low back pain over a one week period. The men’s prevalence of low back pain was 40% and for women, a shocking 60%!

Low back pain occurs in about 60–80% of people at some point in their lives. Menstrual cycle fluctuations can influence pain sensitivity and may help to explain the sex difference. Further explanation may include, biologic response to pregnancy and childbearing, and perimenopausal abdominal weight gain.

Postmenopausal women also show accelerated spinal disc degeneration due to relative estrogen deficiency. While overall females have higher prevalence of low back pain (LBP) across all age groups, LBP prevalence further increases after menopause. Cue the violins for us over 50s.

What was most interesting was that for men low back pain was associated with older age, low education (I’m guessing this suggests the likelihood of more physically demanding jobs), high blood pressure and smoking; but for women if was occupational and ergonomic factors. Even more interesting is that those occupational hazards were standing posture leaning forward and sitting posture leaning forward.

Stooping
Perching

These postures can be described as stooping and perching. They cause forward flexion of the spinal column; and flexion increases compressive forces, that can cause inflammation of spinal joints (facet joints) and disc degeneration and pain.

Even more interesting was this study on the effect of regular posture exercise in improving skeletal pain. The studied concluded that, shoulder pain, mid back pain, and low back pain were relieved with a posture correction exercise program performed for 20 minutes, 3 times a week for 8 weeks.

The reason why a regular posture habit reduces skeletal pain, is that correct posture minimizes the strain on the human body by maintaining balance of the muscles and skeletal alignment. Correct posture implies not inclining the body forward (stooping) backward, left, or right.

Further Resources: Posturecise – How to Create a Healthy Posture Habit

Posture School


If you’re interested in our posture community it’s probably because you look at your health differently. You’re different from most people and you want take control of your own health. You’re different from most people, because you are willing and motivated to take action. However, even though you are more action oriented (I know this because you are still reading), you may still suffer the same challenges as your common variety slouch potato.

My job is to support you before your posture becomes a chronic problem.

The symptoms


Here’s a summary of why you find it challenging to correct your posture:

Doing it wrong

We often jump in great guns with new posture exercises, not knowing if we’re even doing the exercises correctly.

Maintenance

Awareness seems to be a big problem. It’s not so hard to do the posture exercise, but 5 minutes later, we are slouching again.

Pain sucks

Sometimes trying to correct our posture is painful, which isn’t exactly encouraging.

Habit formation

It’s fine doing an exercise here and there, but putting exercises together into a daily practice seems challenging, to say the least.

Further Reading: The Neurology of Habits

Going it alone

There’s a lot of pressure on us to do it all and we find ourselves alone when we need others the most.

It’s OK not to be OK

We need to be OK with opening up and sharing our doubts and struggles. Poor posture affects self esteem and confidence, and this is a universal problem.

The cure


Invest in your well-being

We should hold ourselves accountable for investing in our well-being and development. We should set time and money aside to spend on wellness or self-care.

Remember the mind-body connection

We need to watch what we eat and consider activities such as Posturecise, meditation (even just 1 minute a day), and walking outdoors to help boost our mood, sharpen our focus and enhance our emotional resilience.

Enjoy micro wins

You know that course you are enrolled on at Posture School but haven’t yet started? Set aside 20 minutes and begin watching your first lecture. email me and let me know you did it. Micro win … YES!

Set mini goals

Ridiculously simple wins every time. Pick a favourite posture video, re-watch it, and do the exercise daily – at exactly the same time – for 7 days straight.

Connect, connect, connect

We need to surround ourselves with a trusted support network.

The low back pain study specifically dealt with low back pain, but I found it a useful reminder, that pain is often influenced by our posture.

Did any of the symptoms mentioned above resonate with you? If so, which of the cures will you be taking on? Make sure to pick one and make it a tiny habit, as small positive changes can have huge effects over time.

Are you ready to make posture correction a daily habit?


If you believe in healthy posture in the same way you believe in getting 7-8 hours sleep each night and eating right, AND you really don’t want to live at the gym, then join our tribe. The road to good posture isn’t a quick-fix strategy; it’s a life-long journey and investment in yourself and your health; and may determine how well you age.

Still not sure yet? Feeling like something is holding you back and you don’t know whether to invest in yourself by becoming a member? Then why not watch this video to get some inspiration:

Morning Stiffness | Do You Have Wear & Tear?

Sometimes called degenerative joint disease or “wear and tear”. Wear and tear is a euphemism for osteoarthritis (OA); the most common chronic condition of the joints. It occurs when the cartilage or cushion between joints breaks down; often leading to pain, stiffness and swelling.

In front of me you can see four models of the same two lumbar vertebrae, presented as textbook normal and phase 1, 2 and 3 of spinal degeneration. This is also known as osteoarthritis (osteo meaning bone), degenerative disc disease, or commonly wear and tear.

Normal vs. Phase 2

I don’t like euphemisms. I think you can handle the truth and that like me, you probably don’t like being talked down to. So let’s call it what it is … osteoarthrtis or degenerative discs or spinal arthritis. 

A normal lumbar segment has two vertebra and a healthy cartilage disc in between. If you look at the disc from the top, you can see that the gelatinous or gel-like toothpaste substance, is well contained within the cartilage rings of the disc.

There should also be good symmetrical bony alignment. You may choose to have a chiropractor detect whether or not you have any spinal misalignments. Early on, these subluxations are easily detected and corrected.

A normal spinal segment will also have healthy nerve roots. Lots of space for them to communicate with the body (your organs, bloodvessels and glands). Because our nervous system runs our body, we don’t want any interference from misaligned vertebra (poor posture) or degenerative discs.

Incorrect Posture May Cause Degeneration

Asymmetry in the body (incorrect posture) can lead to early degenerative changes. Posture is so much more than what we see on the outside of our body.

Phase 1

In Phase 1 of spinal degeneration, we may start to see wear in the discs. Evidenced only on MRI imaging, this is a kind of dehydration that occurs in the cartilage tissues..

The rings of cartilage that make up our spinal discs, start to break down. The gelatinous center begins to dry out, a little bit like the toothpaste that is stuck around the outside of the cap. There are likely no effects as yet (or mild effects) to your nerve system.

Phase 1

These people may not present with health problems at this early stage, or they may have some mild symptoms.

Phase 2

After a decade with incorrect posture from poor habits, childhood injuries, athleticism and manual labouring, it is more common to see people with Phase 2 degenerative changes.

Typically, discs are now very dehydrated. The gelatinous nucleus (the toothpaste-like substance) has often leaked right through the dried out cracks in the cartilage rings, that buldge into the space where the spinal cord lives. This is known as a slipped or herniated disc.

There is often nerve irritation in Phase 2. These people often present with leg pain (sciatica); as the nerves that exit the lower lumbar segments, travel through the buttocks and down the leg.

Phase 2 – Herniated or Buldging Discs

Further Resources: Sciatic Leg Pain Relief

They may also present with other health issues (bowel and bladder troubles), as these nerve roots supply our organs, blood vessels and glands in the pelvic region.

In Phase 2, the vertebral bones get closer together, and the ligaments and muscles become slack. There is now excess movement in the bony segments. They have become unstable, and the body responds by laying down more calcium to stabilise the segment. These calcium deposits or bone spurs aren’t generally painful, but lead to stiffness.

Morning stiffness is a strong indicator of spinal degeneration. After waking, it may take a few hours before a person with Phase 2 degeneration feels mobile. 

Phase 3

After a several decades with incorrect postural alignment, past accidents, poor lifestyle, we begin to see advanced arthritic (degenerative) changes. In Phase 3, the discs have completely dried up and can lead to total bony fusion between the vertebral segments of the spine.

Not only is this person extremely stiff, but their spinal segments no longer move independently. This person surprisingly, is often without pain but they are extremely stiff and immobile.

Phase 1, 2 and 3 can only be diagnosed by x-ray and/or MRI. X-Ray imaging show us bony changes and MRI show tissue changes. MRI is the imaging of choice for degenerative disc diagnosis, and x-ray imaging is gold standard for alignment and postural diagnosis.

If you have been diagnosed with wear and tear without an x-ray, you have been done a disservice, in my opinion. A good practitioner can probably accurately guess your diagnosis from signs, symptoms and examination, but they will never be able to accurately assess whether you are in Phase 1, 2 or 3. This is why I would never practice without on-site x-ray facilities.

My first Chiropractic Clinic Align

A person with Phase 3 may present with multiple health issues because the nerve roots are usually seriously comprised in this phase of degeneration. 

Obviously the right time to start paying attention to your posture is at the stage of postural misalignments – before the discs and nerve roots become compromised. While it is never too late to start creating a healthy posture habit for life, the longer we put off getted started, the more likely we are to enter Phase 1, making improvements more challenging and time consuming. 

If I can correct and improve my posture, given my bunion (argh), anatomical short leg, lumbar scoliosis and disc degeneration, anyone can. But please start today!

Reverse Neck Curve – What Causes a Cervical Kyphosis? | Posture Doctor

When the neck curve kinks the wrong way, it pushes the head forward. With the head pushed forward, the lower spine is more prominent and vulnerable.

If you know you have forward head posture and also a hump on the back on your neck, you may benefit from x-ray investigation to rule out a reversed neck curve, also known as cervical kyphosis. When the neck curve kinks the wrong way, it pushes the head forward. With the head pushed forward, the lower spine is more prominent and vulnerable.

Some of my posture pupils complain about fatty neck hump and explain that it has a hard bony feel to it. What they are often feeling, is the kinked region of the neck. If this structural deviation has been there long enough, the body may lay down fat, in an effort to protect the spine – or at least that’s the way I like to simplify and explain a complicated process to my students.

If you’ve suffered long term symptoms that may include: headaches, stiff and/or painful neck, dizziness, arm and hand tingling or numbness, brain fog, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, round shoulders, teeth clenching, TMJ dysfunction or anxiety, and you’ve had any sort of past trauma that might have affected your neck – car accident (over 20mph) , a fall from a height as a child, off a horse, out of a swing, down a flight of stairs – you may find this video relevant.



Further Resources: Forward Head Posture: Cause & Cure

Headache & Migraine | When is Headache Serious?

You don’t get important things done and you definitely can’t motivate yourself feeling like this. Your headaches leave you feeling isolated from your friends and family, your quality of life is deeply affected and it pretty much takes the joy out of life.

Even worse than the pain, you don’t feel you can’t work because you can’t concentrate or focus; you’re worried about your health; it makes you moody because the pain is exhausting.

You don’t get important things done and you definitely can’t motivate yourself feeling like this. Your headaches leave you feeling isolated from your friends and family, your quality of life is deeply affected and it pretty much takes the joy out of life.



Related >>  How to Get Rid of Headache & Migraine

Right Thoracic Scoliosis

But when we lose our body alignment, as we do with scoliosis, the stress and strain of simple daily life (sitting, walking, sleeping and other activities of daily living) lead to muscle tension, pain, weakness, spinal degeneration and poor health.

Good posture allows our body to respond well to stress from simple every day activities. But when we lose our body alignment, as we do with scoliosis, the stress and strain of simple daily life (sitting, walking, sleeping and other activities of daily living) lead to muscle tension, pain, weakness, spinal degeneration and poor health. Try this simple chair exercise to stretch out a right thoracic scoliosis.



Sinus Pain Relief | 5-Minute Congestion Fix

Could your headache be masquerading as a treatable sinus headache? If it is, you will discover this 5 minute congestion fix a lifesaver. Be warned; it’s messy!

Could your headache be masquerading as a treatable sinus headache? If it is, you will discover this 5 minute congestion fix a lifesaver. Be warned; it’s messy!



Further Resources: How to Get Rid of Headache & Migraine Course

Advanced Cat Camel Exercise for One-Sided Low Back Pain

The advanced cat camel posture exercise targets the muscles in your flanks. This stretch is tough to co-ordinate when you first begin, but it feels absolutely wonderful and really helps people who experience any one-sided low back pain.

The advanced cat camel posture exercise targets the muscles in your flanks. This stretch is tough to co-ordinate when you first begin, but it feels absolutely wonderful and really helps people who experience any one-sided low back pain.

Further Resources > Posturecise: How to create a healthy posture habit for life


Lump On Back Of Neck – What is This Ugly Hump?

If this structural deviation has been there long enough, the vertebral discs may begin to thin, the bony vertebrae may begin to develop spurs and the joints may hypertrophy (grow larger). These are all signs of osteoarthritis.

Do you wear high collars to hide the unattractive lump on the back of your neck? What is this ugly fatty neck lump? How did you get it and how can you get rid of it?

Post updated September, 2018


In this post I am discussing the fatty neck lump that develops due to Forward Head Posture (fhp). Fhp is best described as the forward position of the head, relative to the shoulders.

Neck lumps


There are many other possible causes of neck lumps that I am not making reference to here: The fatty lipoma, the goitre, lymph nodes and cysts, to name but a few. 



Cervical kyphosis


If you know your head leans too far forward and you also have a lump of fatty tissue on the back on your neck, you may benefit from x-ray investigation, to rule out a reversed spinal neck curve, called as cervical kyphosis.

When the neck curve kinks the wrong way, it pushes the head forward. When the head is pushed forward, the lower neck (and spine) become more prominent and vulnerable and the body may lay down fat, in an effort to protect this region – or at least that’s the way I like to simplify and explain a complicated process.

Resources: 2nd Opinion For X-Rays

Some people with a fatty neck hump, notice a hard bony feel underneath the fat. What they are feeling, is the kinked region of the neck – the bony vertebra that are more prominent and closer to the surface.

If this structural deviation has been there long enough, the vertebral discs may begin to thin, the bony vertebrae may begin to develop spurs and the joints may hypertrophy (grow larger). These are all signs of osteoarthritis.

Signs & symptoms


If you’ve suffered long term symptoms that may include: headaches, stiff and/or painful neck, dizziness, arm and hand tingling or numbness, brain fog, difficulty concentrating, fatigue, round shoulders, teeth clenching, TMJ dysfunction or anxiety, and you’ve had any sort of past trauma that might have affected your neck – car accident, fall from a height, off a horse, a tumble in the playground, off your bicycle, physical violence, fall down a flight of stairs etc., you may find this video relevant:



Further Resources: Fatty Neck Hump: How to get rid of the fat at the top of your back